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Looking for a food hall in Atlanta? Atlanta’s rising food hall scene means you’ll never go hungry. Photo of Ponce City Market’s central food hall courtesy of Jamestown.

5 Essential Food Halls in Atlanta

BY GIANNINA S. BEDFORD
Atlanta is stacked with renowned restaurants (you can see even more local recs in our
guide to Atlanta’s West Midtown neighborhood
), but to get a varied taste of the city’s gastronomic genius in one spot, there is no better place than an Atlanta food hall. Whether for a power lunch, happy hour, or laid-back dinner date, these epicurean hot spots keep it interesting.
Food halls have been growing in popularity around the globe, and for good reason: They’re an easy, fun way to see what a given city’s best chefs can do… without having to scour Resy for a reservation. The Big Peach is no exception: The top culinary talent in the city has set up shop in various food halls in Atlanta — many within striking distance of
Sentral West Midtown at Star Metals
. You can sample everything from banh mi to arepas to good old fried chicken in spaces that range from rehabbed warehouses to indoor/outdoor complexes. 
Here’s our guide to five of the best food halls in Atlanta. Happy eating!

THE BEST ATLANTA FOOD HALLS

PONCE CITY MARKET

Housed in a former Sears, Roebuck & Co. building in Old Fourth Ward, the Central Food Hall at
Ponce City Market
doesn’t lack for historical character — or tasty bites. Among the more than two dozen stalls and restaurants are concepts from James Beard Award–winning chefs (Hop’s Chicken by Linton Hopkins and W.H. Stiles Fish Camp by Anne Quatrano) and eateries cooking up pho, Indian street food, and Latin-inspired sandwiches. Grab a spot at one of the tables on the main level arranged around concrete pillars, or head up the winding metal staircase for seats with a view of the hall’s well-preserved industrial interior. 

KROG STREET MARKET

The West Coast–style
Krog Street Market
in Inman Park, once home to Atlanta Stove Works and Tyler Perry Studios, is smack at the end of the Atlanta Beltline’s Eastside Trail — perfect for a post-stroll refuel. Within the renovated 1920s warehouse, replete with exposed brick walls, concrete floors, and 20-foot ceilings, is a mix of retail shops, food stalls, and full-service restaurants. Cross some guilty pleasures off the shopping list at Xocolatl Small Batch Chocolate or Hop City Beer & Wine. Then settle in for Latin fare on the lively patio at Bar Mercado or the eclectic, secluded Ticonderoga Club for curated cocktails and bites.

CHATTAHOOCHEE FOOD WORKS AT THE WORKS ATLANTA

The vision of Bizarre Foods host Andrew Zimmern and partner Robert Montwaid,
Chattahoochee Food Works
at The Works Atlanta delivers Vietnamese banh mi, Argentinian empanadas, South African boerewors (a warmly spiced sausage), and other global foodie fare to Atlanta’s Upper Westside. The 26,000-square-foot hall, just two miles from
Sentral West Midtown
, features 31 stalls and spacious indoor/outdoor seating. You’ll find outposts of popular Atlanta spots (Cubanos ATL and Taqueria la Luz) and new concepts from well-known names, like Dash & Chutney, where Chopped and Beat Bobby Flay winner Palak Patel dishes up vegan Indian street food.

POLITAN ROW ATLANTA AT COLONY SQUARE

Just two miles from
Sentral West Midtown
, the elegant
Politan Row
Atlanta food hall is hidden away in a mixed-use office complex in Midtown. Eleven stalls border the mid-century modern space, anchored by the 40-seat Bar Politan. Snack on Chef Archna Becker’s naan pizzas at Tandoori Pizza & Wing Co. or Creole-Mexican street tacos from Pretty Little Tacos. Can’t decide? Splurge on the chef’s table experience, a prix fixe tasting menu offering dishes from multiple vendors. As food halls go, Politan Row is on the upscale side: You can reserve a table in advance and enjoy restaurant-style perks like bussers and tableside water service.

THE MUNICIPAL MARKET (AKA SWEET AUBURN CURB MARKET)

Opened in 1924,
The Municipal Market
is perhaps Atlanta’s most historic food hall, and its nickname reflects its difficult history: At first, Black vendors were relegated to outdoor spaces along the exterior of the building. Through the years, the downtown food-shopping destination evolved into a breeding ground for some of Atlanta’s most successful restaurant concepts, including Grindhouse Killer Burgers, Arepa Mia, and Bell Street Burritos. Today, it boasts 28 independently owned eateries and shops selling meat, produce, and sweets.

THESE ATLANTA FOOD HALLS AND MORE ARE RIGHT IN YOUR BACKYARD WHEN LIVING AT SENTRAL WEST MIDTOWN AT STAR METALS. READY FOR A MOVE?
See more of Sentral West Midtown at Star Metals

ABOUT THE WRITER
Born in Miami and raised in Brazil, Chile, Hawaii, and Australia, Giannina S. Bedford turned her passion for travel into a career penning articles for publications such as Condé Nast Traveler, Virtuoso Life, Hemispheres and TravelandLeisure.com. Today, she calls Atlanta home and can often be found scouting the city’s under-the-radar eateries and newly opened hotels.

MORE TO EXPLORE:
The Insider Guide to Atlanta’s West Midtown
How Vegan Do We Really Need to Be? 
7 Budget Travel Tips: How to Stretch Your Travel Dollars This Year